Canning

Canning Mushrooms

by Debi Chambers

Slice about 5 lbs of mushrooms
Put them in a pan with water to cover, bring to a boil and boil about 5 min. place in 1/2 pint jars and pressure cook 45 min. at 10 lbs of pressure.

Makes about 7 1/2 pints

 

Anne Willan’s Home Canned Cherry Tomatoes

Recipe courtesy Laura Calder

Total Time:  2 hr 40 min

INGREDIENTS

  • Tomatoes
  • Few sprigs fresh thyme
  • Bay leaves
  • 1 or 2 onion slices
  • Water, as needed

DIRECTIONS

Pack whole tomatoes into quart/litre jars with a few thyme sprigs, a couple of bay leaves, and an onion slice or two. Close the lids and set the jars on a rack in a deep pan. Add enough water to cover generously. Weight down with a brick so they don’t float. Simmer for an hour and a half, until they lose their shape and collapse. Let the jars cool in the water so that they form a tight seal. When done, each jar will look only half full of tomatoes.

Properly-handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for years. Sterilizing jars is the first step of preserving foods.

Tips:
Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with a glass, plastic, or metal lid, which has a rubber seal. Two piece lids are best for canning, as they vacuum seal when processed.

To sterilize jars, before filling with jams, pickles, or preserves, wash jars and lids with hot, soapy water. Rinse well and arrange jars and lids open sides up, without touching, on a tray. Boil the jars and lids in a large saucepan, covered with water, for 15 minutes.

Use tongs when handling the hot sterilized jars, to move them from boiling water. Be sure the tongs are sterilized too, by dipping the ends in boiling water for a few minutes.

As a rule, hot preserves go into hot jars and cold preserves go into cold jars. All items used in the process of making jams, jellies, and preserves must be clean. This includes any towels used, and especially your hands.

After the jars are sterilized, you can preserve the food. It is important to follow any canning and processing instructions included in the recipe and refer to USDA guidelines about the sterilization of canned products.

 

Pickled Okra

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds young, small to medium okra pods
  • 4 small dried chiles, split in 1/2
  • 2 teaspoons mustard seeds
  • 12 sprigs fresh dill
  • cloves garlic, whole
  • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 2 cups rice wine vinegar
  • 2 cups bottled water
  • Special Equipment: 4 pint-sized canning jars, sterilized*

Directions

Wash the okra and trim the stem to 1/2-inch. Place 1 chile, 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds, 3 sprigs of dill, 1 clove of garlic and 1/4 teaspoon peppercorns in the bottom of each of 4 sterilized pint canning jars. Divide the okra evenly among the 4 jars, standing them up vertically, alternating stems up and down.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the salt, vinegar and water to a boil. Once boiling, pour this mixture over the okra in the jars, leaving space between the top of the liquid and the lid. Seal the lids. Set in a cool dry place for 2 weeks.

 

*Tips on Sterilizing Jars

Properly-handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for years. Sterilizing jars is the first step of preserving foods.

Sterilizing Tips:

Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with a glass, plastic, or metal lid, which has a rubber seal. Two piece lids are best for canning, as they vacuum seal when processed.

To sterilize jars, before filling with jams, pickles, or preserves, wash jars and lids with hot, soapy water. Rinse well and arrange jars and lids open sides up, without touching, on a tray. Boil the jars and lids in a large saucepan, covered with water, for 15 minutes.

Use tongs when handling the hot sterilized jars, to move them from boiling water. Be sure the tongs are sterilized too, by dipping the ends in boiling water for a few minutes.

As a rule, hot preserves go into hot jars and cold preserves go into cold jars. All items used in the process of making jams, jellies, and preserves must be clean. This includes any towels used, and especially your hands.

After the jars are sterilized, you can preserve the food. It is important to follow any canning and processing instructions included in the recipe and refer to USDA guidelines about the sterilization of canned products.

Original Recipe Link


Powered by http://wordpress.org/ and http://www.hqpremiumthemes.com/
Visit Us On FacebookCheck Our Feed